Truth is Truth, No Matter Who Likes It: Walter Jenkins “Made in the USA” – A Book Review…


Date: April 25, 2013

…Made in the USA: Memoir of a Sex Offender…

…Made in the USA: Memoir of a Sex Offender…

I honestly had to reflect on this book for some time, before offering a public review…This is largely because I really wrestled with the personal conflict over thinking it a really tragic choice of wording, when Walter repeatedly referenced manifestations of his sexual orientation as being akin to “an addiction”…while at the same time, knowing it is not my place to tell another human being how to sum up their own life…

It still felt wrong and somewhat grating…unfair…because it may be a culturally unappreciated orientation…it may be a socially damned sexual orientation…but it is still a sexual orientation, just as sure as that of any other human being…However, most people are not forced, like Walter, to carry their own sexual orientation like a personal and social burden…

…I read this book over a year ago…and I let the unease mellow…Eventually [and all along, really], I figured the wording was intentional in order to couch Walters life story, into some fashion more digestible to “mainstream sensibilities”…just so it could be told, at all…or at least be told, and still hold some hope in being accepted on some level.

This is the true life story of Walter Jenkins…a man who is not only sexually attracted to boys, but who realized a number of sexual encounters with boys [along with accompanying relationships, with said boys]…I appreciate Walters frankness, and down to earth personal assessment…even if I don’t always sense Walter is fair to himself, or to his circumstances…

Most people never get to know the details, of these types of lives…what kinds of things happened…what was going through the mind of “the pedophile” during all of this…the real complexities, of living this kind of life under “current era” cultural circumstances…

Walter does a respectable job, in walking us through his journey…introducing us to himself and his profession…to boys he just knew…to the boy he had his first experience with…and to the handful of others, over which it might be said…that Walter lost touch with his healthy sense of caution and reservation [which Walter calls his “addiction to boys”…but I theorize was more liberated euphoria in the face of formerly denied attraction, than anything else]. Nothing is sugar coated, and Walter even admits to a thing or two, he is not proud of.

…We also get to see what it is like, after Walter has been discovered…arrested…prosecuted…imprisoned…and all the aftermath, trying to re-establish himself into society.

There are a number of enlightening accounts in this book…ones which I think everybody aught to understand…How people like Walter are treated, has got to be one of the single most disastrous in public relations policies today…for as Walters own story attests [as that of so many others], once discovered, you are perpetually an outcast…Walter overcame this, but for many others, they do not…and this is an abysmal way to cripple people, who are dealing with having these kinds of sexual orientations.

People like Walter are expected to pick themselves up, rebuild their lives and return to a productive life…but with so many social barriers…how are they to manage this?…

Even realizing that this book is a self account, and potential could exist for an author overlooking things about themselves…I never had the sense, that Walter was being anything less than honest…He owned up to a lot…He didn’t romanticize anything…it rang true…I was left sincerely thinking, Walters fate did not fit his behavior…For what all he did, Walter did not deserve the harsh fate he received, in my opinion…

This book was a good read, in my opinion…Not only that, but it is an important read…and it struck a lot of cords with me, personally. I hold a great deal of respect for Walter Jenkins, for having the courage to write and publish this book.

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