Why the majority is always wrong – Paul Rulkens…


Date: September 01, 2017

01) Why the majority is always wrong – Paul Rulkens


“This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Paul Rulkens is an expert in achieving big goals in the easiest, fastest and most elegant way possible. Originally trained as a chemical engineer, he has moved his focus to the fascinating field of high performance.

Paul Rulkens is an expert in achieving big goals in the easiest, fastest and most elegant way possible. Originally trained as a chemical engineer, he has moved his focus to the fascinating field of high performance. His work is based on his knowledge and experience about the practical application of behavioral psychology, neuroscience and especially common sense. He currently works worldwide to make successful people, teams and organizations even more successful. He lives with his wife and two children in Maastricht.”

4 thoughts on “Why the majority is always wrong – Paul Rulkens…

  1. Yure

    Even if I can read and write in English fairly well, I struggle with spoken English due to the pronunciation and accents. So, why is the majority always wrong? Mind writing it for me? Cause it’s hard for me to get what a video in English says. It’s not a problem with hearing, it’s just that English isn’t my first language.

    Reply
    1. eqfoundation Post author

      I think it’s fair to summarize as follows…

      …Things and situations, and our understanding of them, are regularly changing. Most people don’t alter their actions, to fit the new circumstances. People go back to doing, what they think of as “having worked in the past”…which is why they are in the wrong…What worked in the past, wont necessarily work in the future.

      He claims only three percent of people are inclined to do anything different…

      …I presume, I’m amongst those three percent.

      He talks about how being a lazy thinker, makes one develop mental tunnel vision.

      He talks about thinking inside of the box…and uses cultural laws, as an example…”We think in legal boundaries”…”We also think in logical boundaries, physical boundaries and moral boundaries”…

      It sounds a lot like things I’ve been writing and speaking about, for many years…No doubt, that’s why I decided to share it.

      It’s about the mind, that is chained to systems of thought and behavior…to the point where virtually nobody can see things for what they are.

      The road kill reference is a very good example, of how different people in different parts of the world, think and behave very differently.

      Salvaging fresh road kill for food is practical…even though it would virtually never be done, in the USA…Because of lost knowledge [and nerve] on how to prepare such things…and because of how we imagine “being reduced to that” as being “demeaning”…most of us are beholden to stores, with pre-packaged food, for our nourishment.

      The “big secret”, right in front of us…is that nobody honestly has to be trapped in this way of doing things…But, most people will continue to do things this way, even while they complain about high food prices…and maybe even exist on a starvation diet.

      Humans don’t tend to think very broadly…Most people are beholden to “norms”.

      How to kick oneself out of the box?…and become innovative?…

      Advancement happens, when people finally decide to break standards and “norms”…

      Of course…he is talking about industry and business…but his message can be applied in all areas of life.

      Reply
      1. Yure

        I agree, yes. Personally, I change whenever what I’m doing starts failing. But I notice how some people would rather stay in a comfort zone and pretend that the problem doesn’t exist. Or that things will be fine as long as nothing changes. Or, like how some people say, do what we do just because it’s what we have been doing up to now.

      2. eqfoundation Post author

        It’s often hard to change course…but, yes…I try to stay flexible…

        …I’ve changed style and tactic several times, even in just my blogging, and online activity.

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