Salvation, Shame & Shunning – The Story of Lloyd Evans: Ex-Jehovah’s Witness (TTA Podcast 344)…


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Date: September 20, 2017

01) Salvation, Shame & Shunning – The Story of Lloyd Evans: Ex-Jehovah’s Witness (TTA Podcast 344)


“Ex-Jehovah’s Witness and activist Lloyd Evans tells his compelling story about his introduction to – and escape from – the JWs.

Lloyd’s website: http://jwsurvey.org/
Lloyd’s book: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0995669104
Lloyd’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/johncedars1929

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10 thoughts on “Salvation, Shame & Shunning – The Story of Lloyd Evans: Ex-Jehovah’s Witness (TTA Podcast 344)…

  1. Yure

    I’m the only person in this house who isn’t a Jehovah witness. I prefer not to filiate myself to any church or religious group at all. But the degree of psychological pressure can be immense. I don’t have anything against Jehovah witnesses themselves, my problem is with the Watchtower and their practices. The witnesses can be pretty nice people. I never associated with any church after becoming inactive in Catholicism, but some people think that me being the only non-Jehovah-witness in a house of four is because I was disfellowed. For some witnesses, it’s death sentence. You aren’t supposed to talk or be around a disfellowed. He isn’t only a complete stranger, he is someone to be avoided. I had to explain to a witness friend that it wasn’t the case, before he could trust me again.

    Reply
    1. eqfoundation Post author

      I have a little bit of understanding on JWs, though not from personal experience.

      It must be quite something, living in a house full of them.

      I think back to my own childhood, youth and early adulthood…and the kind of naïve, unquestioned, inner sense of goodness, associated with doing church related things…like trying to convince someone into the religion…or singing the songs of the religion…listening to sermons and stories out of the religion…etc, etc…

      Jehovah’s Witnesses always remind me of that state of mind.

      One some level…it’s almost enviable…But then you learn of the other aspects of that church…like how they never allow their members to stay away from the church grounds, for more than two days in a row…

      I hesitate to say “even our church isn’t that manipulative and life saturating”…because our church owned a school…and it really depended on who you were, and what your designated place was, where it came to how much personal autonomy you had. If you were a kid and you wanted no part of it, you’d have to do something extreme…like chronic misbehaving…getting caught smoking or drinking…you’d have to do something that offended the church so bad, that they kicked you out…Which in turn could cause problems for you, within your own family and home life…So, it wasn’t exactly “a free choice”…It came with a steep cost…I saw this happen with several kids, over the years.

      I think the only time I genuinely liked being in the church, is when I was really young…When it was more like story time and games…and when you looked forward to it, because you got to see your friends and hang out with them for a while after the church doings were over with…As I grew older, it just started loosing it’s enchanting allure.

      I still remember the first time a small group of us boys decided to sneak out of a group gathering…It wasn’t your typical small classes, that Sunday…we wouldn’t have been so easily identified as gone…We fond some place on the property, to just hang out and goof off…This was about third or fourth grade.

      Reply
      1. Yure

        I never heard of the two-days rule. But there are other things I dislike, such as forbidding blood transfusion. Their argument is that the Bible says we shouldn’t drink blood and, if your doctor said that you aren’t supposed to drink alcohol, then you shouldn’t inject it in your veins. But if you drink alcohol or inject alcohol, it’s the same thing. But if you drink blood, the blood is destroyed by metabolism. If you inject blood, however, the blood is preserved.
        What made me reject them at first, however, was the banning on masturbation. I was 14 and… well…

      2. eqfoundation Post author

        I learned about it in a podcast, with a former JW. Maybe it was a thing amongst the most devout sects?

        Nothing stopped me from masturbation, either…and some of my creativity lead to crazy fun masturbation.

    2. feinmann0

      Many people treat Jehovah’s Witnesses with disdain, but I think those that do door to door selling of their religion are really brave people. In my experience, apart from inevitably ringing the doorbell at the wrong moment, they are always very smartly turned out and never seem to lack conviction, surely a really hard image to maintain in the face of atheistic mockery and derision.

      I recall one time we opened the front door, and were nonplussed by a gorgeous teen girl and a handsome teen boy, who must have been about 16. If ever the word virginal sprung to our lips, it was at that moment. We listened intently to what they had to say, but not listening to a word, just gazing at their beauty. Once they had finished, the boy asked us if we had any questions whilst simultaneously handing over the latest edition of their Watchtower magazine. At that moment devils horns sprouted from my forehead, and I said: “Would you like to come inside for some wonderful hot sex?”

      Needless to say we never saw them again after that.

      Reply
      1. eqfoundation Post author

        I agree that it takes major nerves…

        …Once I got so old, I wasn’t even willing to “witness” for the church I grew up in….It was embarrassing…and I was way too shy.

        I have only one encounter with JWs visiting my home…

        I heard a knock on the door….opened it, to find a boy of about eleven or twelve, leaving one of those “Watchtower” booklets up against the door…I think I startled him…

        …I reached down and picked it up…

        He was there with an older boy, who I figure was probably his brother…maybe fifteen…

        I think they were just passing out their literature, and they probably didn’t intend on coming inside, for a long discussion…

        It’s been so many years ago…I forget what they even said to me…Probably just an invitation to come to their church…and giving me some version of “have a nice day”, in line with their church’s persona.

        The young boy was pretty cute…I wouldn’t have minded, had they come inside for a visit.

      2. eqfoundation Post author

        Some religious organizations certainly are willing to break laws…

        …I think bans on speech, are always bad laws…And it grants them a peculiar justification, by standing up against the unjust laws.

        Let them speak out in the open…Let that speech be critiqued…

        …Problem with Russia, is that the politicians [dictators, honestly] don’t want organizations to contend with, which aren’t completely submissive to them.

        I suppose it’s a problem in all cultures, hostile people using politicians and government to attack and suppress others…But countries like Russia have a political and social structure, which amplifies the outcome all the more.

      3. Yure

        Any ban on freedom of speech is begging to be ignored. I praise them if they continue their preaching. Their temples were taken by government too, as they were called “extremist”. The new laws on extremism are too vague and can be used to criminalize almost any faith that isn’t normative.

      4. eqfoundation Post author

        The tragedy about Russia…is in it’s taking of something fundamentally noble, like the ideals of social safety nets communism is built upon…and imposing an inhumane, abusive regime on top of it.

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