Faerie Tales (1992) Gay Documentary With Harry Hay!…


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Date: November 29, 2017

01) Faerie Tales (1992) Gay Documentary With Harry Hay!


“Faerie Tales (1992) documentary short by Philippe Roques.

The Radical Faeries are a loosely affiliated worldwide network and counter-cultural movement seeking to redefine queer consciousness through spirituality.[1] Sometimes deemed a form of contemporary Paganism, it adopts elements from anarchism and environmentalism.

Rejecting hetero-imitation, the Radical Faerie movement began during the 1970s sexual revolution among gay men in the United States.[2] The movement has expanded in tandem with the larger gay rights movement, challenging commercialization and patriarchal aspects of modern LGBT life while celebrating pagan constructs and rituals.[3] Faeries tend to be fiercely independent, anti-establishment, and community-focused.[3]

The Radical Faerie movement was founded in California in 1979 by gay activists Harry Hay, Mitch Walker, John Burnside, and Don Kilhefner, who wanted to create an alternative to what they saw as the assimilationist attitude of the mainstream U.S. gay community. Influenced by the legacy of the counterculture of the 1960s, they held the first Spiritual Conference for Radical Fairies in Arizona in September 1979. From there, various regional Faerie Circles were formed, and other large rural gatherings organized. Although Walker and Kilhefner broke from Hay in 1980, the movement continued to grow, having expanded into an international network soon after the second Faerie gathering in 1980.

Today Radical Faeries embody a wide range of genders, sexual orientations, and identities. All sanctuaries and most gatherings are open to all, though a decreasing minority of gatherings still focus on the particular spiritual experience of man-loving men co-creating temporary autonomous zones.[4] Faerie sanctuaries adapt rural living and environmentally sustainable concepts to modern technologies as part of creative expression.[3] Radical Faerie communities are generally inspired by indigenous, native or traditional spiritualities, especially those that incorporate genderqueer sensibilities.[5]”

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