Category Archives: Frontier Kitchen

Cooking & Food

Pot Roast with Mashed Baked Potatoes…


Frontier Kitchen
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Date: December 16, 2020

01) LINK


“One of the best bang-for-buck meals of all time.

***RECIPE, FEEDS 6-8 PEOPLE***

FOR THE POT ROAST

2.5-3 lb beef chuck roast
1 large onion
1-2 stalks celery
1 lb large carrots
1-2 cups red wine (about half a bottle)
28 oz can crushed tomatoes
2-3 tablespoons tomato paste
1/4 cup flour
2-3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1-2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
oil
salt
pepper
garlic powder
fresh rosemary

FOR THE POTATOES

2 lbs baking potatoes (Russets), or a mixture of Russets and Yukon Golds
1-2 sticks (4-8 ounces) butter, ideally cultured butter
Half a head of garlic
1/2-1 cup milk
salt
pepper

If you want to limit the amount of fat in the final dish, trim any large globs of fat out of the inside of the meat — don’t worry about mangling it. Put a thin film of oil into a large Dutch oven on medium heat, then slowly brown the meat, taking care to not let anything burn on the bottom of the pan. Start the oven pre-heating to 350 F.

While the meat is browning, peel and cut the onion into thin quarter-circles and chop the celery into small pieces. When the meat is brown, remove it to a plate and put in the vegetables. Keep the vegetables moving and cook them until you’re worried the fond on the pan is going to burn, then put in the tomato paste and the flour and stir aggressively to disperse the flour through the fat in the pan.

When you’re REALLY worried stuff is gonna burn, pour in the wine and start scraping the bottom with a wooden spoon. Pour in the tomatoes and the Worcestershire sauce, and sprinkle on a couple teaspoons of garlic powder. Stir to incorporate, then return the meat and any juices that collected in the plate. Toss the meat in the sauce, put the lid on the pot, and put the pot in the oven.

Put the potatoes in the oven too, right on the rack, and cook until easily pierced with a fork, 1-1.5 hours. Remove the potatoes and let them cool for a moment. Put a large pan on medium heat and put in the butter to slowly melt. Meanwhile, peel and chop the garlic. Put the garlic into the hot butter then immediately turn the heat off. If anything looks or smells like it’s going to burn, move the pan to a cooler surface. Cut the potatoes in half, scoop out the flesh and pass it through a ricer into the pan. Mix with enough milk to give you the texture you want, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Cover and keep warm until dinner.

Peel the carrots and cut them into large chunks of roughly equal mass.

After 2-3 hours total in the oven, the meat should be soft enough that you could pull it apart with forks (but don’t actually do that yet). Put the carrots into the pot, get them coated in the sauce but not submerged, and return the pot to the oven WITHOUT THE LID. Let cook until the carrots are just tender enough to be pierced with a fork, about an hour.

Remove the pot from the oven. Chop up a few stems of fresh rosemary and put that in, along with some salt, pepper and the vinegar. Stir to incorporate. The meat will start breaking up when you stir, which is a good thing. Taste the sauce and add any additional seasoning or vinegar, then stir one last time. If any of the meat has not yet broken apart into manageable chunks, pull it apart with forks.

That’s it. Eat.”

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Sub-Blog ArchiveFrontier Series

How Cast Iron Pans Are Made by Hand at Borough Furnace — Handmade…


Frontier Kitchen
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Date: December 13, 2020

01) LINK


“On this episode of ‘Handmade,’ John Truex and Liz Seru, co-owners of metal casting workshop Borough Furnace in Owego, New York, show us how cast iron pans are made by hand, from designing, casting, sanding, seasoning and beyond. You can see more of the shop’s work here:

http://boroughfurnace.com/

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Sub-Blog ArchiveFrontier Series

What Medieval Peasants Really Ate In A Day…


Frontier Kitchen
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Date: November 27, 2020

01) LINK


“Medieval peasants didn’t exactly have it easy. Aside from the endless wars, the abject poverty, and the occasional plague, they had to get by on a relatively meagre diet. But just what did they actually rustle up for dinner? Here’s what medieval peasants really ate in a day.

Here’s a question: how does anyone actually know what peasants ate in the medieval era? After all, it’s not like peasants were keeping detailed records of their daily lives. In fact, it’s been estimated that, even in the later years of the Middle Ages, only around 10 percent of men and one percent of women were literate. And those that were literate weren’t really writing about their breakfast, lunch, or dinner — so researchers have had to get creative.

For example, in 2019, a study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science took samples of medieval pottery from West Cotton, Northamptonshire and analyzed the residue left inside. The molecular analysis allowed them to put together a picture of what was cooked inside.

What did they find? Well, the staples were meat — mostly sheep and cattle — as well as cabbage stews, cooked in the pots over an open hearth. There were also a lot of dairy products, which the study notes were affectionately referred to as “white meats of the poor.”

A few years ago, English Heritage followed a reenactor as she made a traditional medieval stew, and it’ll actually look pretty familiar to 21st-century cooks. Meat was first browned over an open fire, then transferred to a large dish. Carrots, onions, and any other available veg were added, as well as a little cider. It was sometimes seasoned with whatever herbs could be foraged, then barley was added, too — a staple grain in peasant diets. That was then left to cook over an open fire or a hearth. Doesn’t sound so awful, does it?

Watch the video for more about What Medieval Peasants Really Ate In A Day!”

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Sub-Blog ArchiveFrontier Series

COMPOUND BUTTER EXPERIMENT! Arby’s, Burger King, Taco Bell and Wendy’s…


Frontier Kitchen
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Date: November 10, 2020

01) LINK


“After an awesome success with McDonald’s Compound butter experiment, you asked me to test out other types of fast food. So today I am trying out Arby’s, Burger King, Taco Bell and Wendy’s! I want to find which one is best to make an awesome compound butter so you can give that a try at home.”

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Sub-Blog ArchiveFrontier Series