Category Archives: Frontier Kitchen

Cooking & Food

How To Eat Chunky Soup…


Frontier Kitchen
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Date: February 24, 2021

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“This is how to eat Campbell’s Chunky Style Vegetable With Beef Soup. It is very chunky. I recommend it or the store brand equivalent. By adding just a few more fresh vegetables and some slices of toast you will find the soup to be more wholesome and filling. My friend Arthur, who lived to be 95 used to have this most days for lunch when he was at home. Arthur also ate TV dinners and he drank root beer and ate white bread. The oldest people I have known were not health food fanatics. They did have a peaceful personality and they ate a lot of small meals and snacks instead of big meals. I do recommend the chunky style big cans of soup.”

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Myths About Cast Iron Skillets You Need To Stop Believing…


Frontier Kitchen
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Date: February 21, 2021

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“If you are the proud owner of a cast iron skillet, then you might believe some of the most oft-told tales about what you should and shouldn’t do with cast iron cookware. There’s so many stories out there that reaching for a cast iron skillet, pot, or pan can seem a little intimidating, but don’t worry — the truth isn’t as complicated as you might think.

First, the good news! Cast iron is actually very low-maintenance once you know how to properly care for it, and it’s very durable. If properly cared for, there’s no need to worry about anything going awry.

There’s an idea floating around the cast iron community that the pans are delicate, but there are some that have stuck around through generations. Need proof? Head to an antique store, estate sale, thrift shop, or auction. Chances are pretty good that you’ll see some cast iron cookware that’s been passed down for years, and that doesn’t really make you think “delicate,” right?

The biggest myth around cast iron skillets is that they cannot be washed with dish soap, as it’ll ruin the seasoning. Though dish soap is made to strip oil, it cannot remove the skillet’s seasoning because the seasoning itself is not just a coating of oil.

You build up a skillet’s seasoning by pouring a small amount of oil into the hot pan and smoothing it over the surface with a paper towel. By heating the pan as you smear the oil, the oil cooks onto the pan and chemically attaches itself to the metal. While you definitely shouldn’t soak the skillet in soapy water, using a bit of dish soap and warm water to clean your pan will not do any long-lasting damage.

After your skillet has been cleaned, you should re-season it, too. It’s another falsehood that pre-seasoned pans don’t have to ever be seasoned again. To do so, you can place the skillet on a burner set to the highest heat to let the remaining water evaporate. After the skillet is dry, just add and spread your oil. When it smokes, smear it around again and remove it from the heat to cool.

It’s that easy! Now, there’s no more kitchen confusion… about cleaning your cast iron, at least.

Watch this video for more myths about cast iron skillets you need to stop believing!”

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Pot Roast with Mashed Baked Potatoes…


Frontier Kitchen
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Date: December 16, 2020

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“One of the best bang-for-buck meals of all time.

***RECIPE, FEEDS 6-8 PEOPLE***

FOR THE POT ROAST

2.5-3 lb beef chuck roast
1 large onion
1-2 stalks celery
1 lb large carrots
1-2 cups red wine (about half a bottle)
28 oz can crushed tomatoes
2-3 tablespoons tomato paste
1/4 cup flour
2-3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1-2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
oil
salt
pepper
garlic powder
fresh rosemary

FOR THE POTATOES

2 lbs baking potatoes (Russets), or a mixture of Russets and Yukon Golds
1-2 sticks (4-8 ounces) butter, ideally cultured butter
Half a head of garlic
1/2-1 cup milk
salt
pepper

If you want to limit the amount of fat in the final dish, trim any large globs of fat out of the inside of the meat — don’t worry about mangling it. Put a thin film of oil into a large Dutch oven on medium heat, then slowly brown the meat, taking care to not let anything burn on the bottom of the pan. Start the oven pre-heating to 350 F.

While the meat is browning, peel and cut the onion into thin quarter-circles and chop the celery into small pieces. When the meat is brown, remove it to a plate and put in the vegetables. Keep the vegetables moving and cook them until you’re worried the fond on the pan is going to burn, then put in the tomato paste and the flour and stir aggressively to disperse the flour through the fat in the pan.

When you’re REALLY worried stuff is gonna burn, pour in the wine and start scraping the bottom with a wooden spoon. Pour in the tomatoes and the Worcestershire sauce, and sprinkle on a couple teaspoons of garlic powder. Stir to incorporate, then return the meat and any juices that collected in the plate. Toss the meat in the sauce, put the lid on the pot, and put the pot in the oven.

Put the potatoes in the oven too, right on the rack, and cook until easily pierced with a fork, 1-1.5 hours. Remove the potatoes and let them cool for a moment. Put a large pan on medium heat and put in the butter to slowly melt. Meanwhile, peel and chop the garlic. Put the garlic into the hot butter then immediately turn the heat off. If anything looks or smells like it’s going to burn, move the pan to a cooler surface. Cut the potatoes in half, scoop out the flesh and pass it through a ricer into the pan. Mix with enough milk to give you the texture you want, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Cover and keep warm until dinner.

Peel the carrots and cut them into large chunks of roughly equal mass.

After 2-3 hours total in the oven, the meat should be soft enough that you could pull it apart with forks (but don’t actually do that yet). Put the carrots into the pot, get them coated in the sauce but not submerged, and return the pot to the oven WITHOUT THE LID. Let cook until the carrots are just tender enough to be pierced with a fork, about an hour.

Remove the pot from the oven. Chop up a few stems of fresh rosemary and put that in, along with some salt, pepper and the vinegar. Stir to incorporate. The meat will start breaking up when you stir, which is a good thing. Taste the sauce and add any additional seasoning or vinegar, then stir one last time. If any of the meat has not yet broken apart into manageable chunks, pull it apart with forks.

That’s it. Eat.”

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How Cast Iron Pans Are Made by Hand at Borough Furnace — Handmade…


Frontier Kitchen
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Date: December 13, 2020

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“On this episode of ‘Handmade,’ John Truex and Liz Seru, co-owners of metal casting workshop Borough Furnace in Owego, New York, show us how cast iron pans are made by hand, from designing, casting, sanding, seasoning and beyond. You can see more of the shop’s work here:

http://boroughfurnace.com/

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